Explosion 1812

This brand new documentary, presented by historian Dan Snow, uses dramatic reconstruction, captivating CGI and archaeological evidence in exploring the stories and the battles in the war between the United States and the then British colony of Upper Canada in 1812.

Explosion 1812

This brand new documentary, presented by historian Dan Snow, uses dramatic reconstruction, captivating CGI and archaeological evidence in exploring the stories and the battles in the war between the United States and the then British colony of Upper Canada in 1812.

Convinced they would be welcomed with open arms, the former president Thomas Jefferson declared that victory would be a 'mere matter of marching'. However, it didn't turn out that way...

One year into the war - after the Americans had faced a series of bloody encounters on the battlefield - the United States attacked York, the capital of Upper Canada. In the present day, York is now known as Toronto in Ontario, home to five million people and with very little evidence of the muddy settlement it once was. However, it was here that the British defenders of Fort York detonated their Grand Magazine.

The Grand Magazine was an armoury packed to the rafters with much of the province's ammunition supply, including nearly 30,000 pounds of gun powder, together with 10,000 cannonballs and 30,000 cartridges. At the time it was one of the biggest explosions that had ever been witnessed in North America and more than 250 American soldiers were either killed or maimed by the blast.

It set in motion a series of events that would change the fate of a continent.