I was a Jet Set Stewardess

The 1960s were the golden age of jet air travel. Pilots looked like matinee idols, air stewardesses looked like Jean Shrimpton and passengers were served seven-course meals in economy. Every child wanted to work on an airline growing up, and the new age of air travel seemed to encapsulate the optimism, the glamour and the new consumerism of the decade.

I was a Jet Set Stewardess

The 1960s were the golden age of jet air travel. Pilots looked like matinee idols, air stewardesses looked like Jean Shrimpton and passengers were served seven-course meals in economy. Every child wanted to work on an airline growing up, and the new age of air travel seemed to encapsulate the optimism, the glamour and the new consumerism of the decade.

Now in this documentary, part of Yesterday’s Spirit Of The Sixties season, relives this glamorous age through the testimonies and personal archive of the men and women who pioneered the jet set lifestyle.

During the austerity of the post war years, air travel was still very much the domain of the wealthy and those who worked in the colonies. But the invention of the jet engine coincided with everything the 60s stood for – increased leisure time, the cult of celebrity, fashion, food and fun.

Suddenly starlets and movie stars, politicians and upwardly mobile families were taking to the skies, but the era also saw the emergence of a whole new breed of woman: the air stewardess. Seen as a glamorous free spirit who looked like a Biba model, she was as reassuring as Florence Nightingale and spoke like a Lucie Clayton graduate.

But what was it really like to work in the industry? I Was A Jet Set Stewardess finds out the truth behind the glamour, the cool and the air miles.